Women's Human Rights Resources Database

 

Your search for the subject "Applying International Human Rights Law" found 22 records.

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Documents by United Nations Bodies and Agencies

1
Arrangements and Practices for the Interaction of Non-Governmental Organizations in All Activities of the United Nations System, Report of the Secretary-General, A/53/170, July 10, 1998.

Also know as the 'Sorenson Report', this 1998 publication addresses the participation of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) throughout the United Nations system. The activities of non-state actors have become essential to international public life and the United Nations is recognizing this revolution. Topics addressed in this report include current and potential institutional arrangements for NGO participation and NGOs as operational partners. This aspect includes the possibilities of and constraints on NGO participation and the need for clear but flexible guidelines that would bridge the work of NGOs and the UN. The report suggests websites, conferences, newsletters, and diverse regional participation and capacity-building in developing countries could be employed to these ends. [Descriptors: Applying Human Rights Law - International, International]

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2
Communications Procedures, Fact Sheet No.7, Office of the High Commissioner For Human Rights

This fact sheet provides an overview of the different procedures that are available to bring a communication or complaint before the various human rights organs of the United Nations. Part I of the Fact Sheet discusses complaints under the international human rights treaties. Part II discusses complaints to the Commission of Human Rights and the Commission on the Status of Women. The Fact Sheet also includes a "Model Complaint Form" for use before the Human Rights Committee, the Committee against Torture and the Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. [Descriptors: Applying Human Rights Law - International, International]

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3
United Nations, Ending violence against women: From words to action, Study of the Secretary-General , (2006)

This study provides an overview of the context and structural causes of violence against women, describes the types and forms of violence experienced, and its consequences and costs. The study discusses States responsibilities to address violence against women and identifies gaps in the implementation of international standards. The study describes promising practices currently in action as well as challenges in implementation of law and services for the prevention of violence against women. Lastly, the report calls on states to prioritize efforts to eradicate violence against women at the local, national and international levels

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4
UN Division for the Advancement of Women, Handbook for Legislation on Violence Against Women, ST/ESA/32 (2010)

This handbook is intended to help States and stakeholders develop and enhance existing laws to protect women based on the results of an expert group meeting by the UN Division for the Advancement of Women. The handbook outlines the international and regional legal and policy frameworks which mandate States to enact and implement comprehensive and effective laws addressing violence against women. A model framework for legislation is offered, which includes recommendations on legislative content and examples of best practices. The handbook also identifies considerations relevant to drafting legislation on violence against women.

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5
United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women, Handbook on National Action Plans for Violence Against Women , (2012)

This handbook is designed to help States develop and enhance their national action plans in order to effectively deal with the issue of violence against women. Based on expert advice and good practices currently existing in national action plans, this handbook examines existing human rights treaties and policies and provides a model framework on how to develop a States national action plan on violence against women. Intended to both prevent and respond to violence against women, it includes advice on implementation, guiding principles and how to effectively monitor the action plans outcomes.

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6
UN Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, Statement of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women on the 10th Anniversary of Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security (2010),

With the adoption of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security in 2000, the international community signaled its commitment to addressing the inequalities that exist between men and women in armed conflict. While attempts have been made to address the inequalities, progress has been limited and sexual violence and rape continue to be used as a means of war. One of the primary issues is the lack of an accountability mechanism to ensure implementation of the resolution. CEDAW is requesting that Member States collaborate with civil societies and NGOs to improve implementation. The Committee notes that states can help reduce the level of violence during armed conflict by responding to womens needs and protection, prosecuting the individuals responsible for the violence, and encouraging the involvement of women in decision-making.

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Government Bodies

7
Status of Women Canada, Canada and the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW): An Overview, Ottawa: Status of Women Canada

This document provides a basic overview of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and of the Convention's Optional Protocol. The Optional Protocol permits individuals or groups to petition the Convention's monitoring committee with respect to alleged treaty violations and also permits the committee to make inquiries with respect to serious violations by States Parties. With respect to individual or group petitions, the document states how a communication (petition) must be made in the Canadian legal system, given existing methods of redress for human rights violations in Canada. [Descriptors: Applying Human Rights Law - Domestic, CEDAW Convention, Canada]

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8
Government of Canada, Canada's Report to the CEDAW Committee (Fifth Periodic Report of States Parties - Canada), CEDAW/C/CAN/5 (April 9, 2002)

Canada submitted its Fifth Periodic Report to the Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW Committee) in April 2002. The report was considered by the CEDAW Committee at its 28th Session, 13-31st January, 2003, at U.N. Headquarters in New York. The report outlines Canada's measures to achieve equality for women in accordance with its obligations under the CEDAW Convention. The report is divided into four sections with Part I of the report providing an overview of the situation of women in Canada generally, and Parts II, III & IV containing a review of the measures adopted by the federal, provincial and territorial governments respectively. [Descriptors: Applying Human Rights Law - Domestic, CEDAW Convention, Canada]

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9
Status of Women Canada, Canada's Response to the UN Questionnaire to Governments on Implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action (1995) and the Outcome of the Twenty-Third Special Session of the General Assembly (2000), Ottawa: Status of Women Canada

This document is a report prepared as an update on measures taken by the Canadian government to implement the Beijing Platform for Action. It describes steps taken by provincial and federal governments since the adoption of the Platform in 1995 and an analysis of the status of gender equality in Canada according to employment trends and sociological data available. The bulk of the document is devoted to examining federal government measures to address the Platform's areas of concern, including: women and poverty, education and training of women, women and health, violence against women, women and armed conflict, and the human rights of women. The document also describes Canadian mechanisms for advancing women's rights. [Descriptors: Applying Human Rights Law - Domestic, Canada]

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10
Australian Human Rights Commission, Mechanisms for advancing women's human rights: A guide to using the Optional Protocol to CEDAW and other international complaint mechanisms, (2011)

This guide, published by the Australian Human Rights Commission, is designed to provide practical information for women experiencing violations of their rights, their lawyers and advocates on how to access the Optional Protocol to CEDAW and other international complaint mechanisms. It provides detailed information on CEDAW and its Optional Protocol, including a thorough explanation of the means through which it can be accessed, namely the communication and inquiry procedures. The guide also provides information on other international complaint mechanisms, as well as practical considerations such as seeking legal assistance. The appendices include sample communication procedure forms and inquiries.

Australian Human Rights Commission, Mechanisms for advancing women's human rights: A guide to using the Optional Protocol to CEDAW and other international complaint mechanisms, (2011), online: .

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Information from Non-Governmental Organizations

11
Amnesty International, Amnesty International Report 2007: the state of the worlds human rights (2007),

This report by Amnesty International documents the toll that fear takes on victims of armed conflict. The document is divided into regional overviews, looking at issues in Africa, the Americas, Asia-Pacific, Europe-Central Asia and the Middle East-North Africa. The document begins with an editorial examination of the toll the conflict takes on women and the difficulties involved in addressing these problems; while many actions taken appear to be intended to address crime, they are often more concerned with maintaining the status quo by controlling the population through fear. The document notes the inadequacy of funding to protect women and examines controversial laws in different countries which regulate womens attire. The report discusses difficulties that women face specific to rape and sexual assault, lack of political power, and unequal access to justice.

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12
Human Rights Internet, For the Record: A Focus on Canada - Bringing Economic, Social and Cultural Rights Home), Vol. 3 (no date)

This comprehensive report addresses economic, social and cultural rights both on a global level and within Canada. The Canadian section includes information on Government of Canada reports submitted to various United Nations (UN) bodies and the UN responses, including Canada's reports under the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and the subsequent concerns and recommendations of the UN treaty monitoring body. The report also summarizes reports by the UN Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women, with links to the full reports. The second part of the report includes summaries of Canadian legal cases which interpret the international law on economic and social rights. Several of these cases deal specifically with the human rights concerns of women. [Descriptors: Social and Economic Rights, Applying Human Rights Law - Domestic, Canada]

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13
Committee on African Affairs of the New York City Bar, Gender-Based Violence Laws in Sub-Saharan Africa (2007),

This report provides an overview of legislation in sub-Saharan Africa intended to combat gender-based violence against women, specifically rape, sexual assault, and domestic violence. The report reviews prohibitions on gender-based violence in international and regional instruments, including decisions from international tribunals and assesses applicable constitutional provisions in certain sub-Saharan African states. The report identifies what should be included when drafting and implementing relevant legislation, such as training for public officials and provision of services to victims. The report is intended as a guide for countries in sub-Saharan Africa that have not yet passed legislation addressing gender-based violence.

Committee on African Affairs of the New York City Bar, Gender-Based Violence Laws in Sub-Saharan Africa.

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14
Organization of American States, Legal Standards Related to Gender Equality and Womens Rights in the Inter-American Human Rights System: Development and Application, 2011,

This report examines the impact of orders from the Inter-American Court of Human Rights (Court) on jurisprudence in the Americas relating to womens human rights. The report supports the standards of the Court and advocates an expansion of its recommendations. The report examines issues of violence and discrimination against women, and outlines the position of courts in the Americas on the merits of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR). Subsections of the report include discussions of domestic violence, violence against women and homicide, violence against women and divorce, human trafficking, reproductive rights, political rights, and labour rights. The report ultimately recommends holding nations responsible for enforcing the legal policies they have committed to and notes the importance of the judicial branch in this endeavour. Finally, the report notes positive legislative and policy developments that have occurred in the Americas since the IACHR standards were established.

OAS, Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, Legal Standards Related to Gender Equality and Womens Rights in the Inter-American Human Rights System: Development and Application, OR OEA/Ser.L/V/II.143/Doc.60 (2011), online: http://www.oas.org.

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15
International Women's Rights Action Watch, New Guidelines for Human Rights Treaty Reporting: Opportunities for Women's Human Rights NGOs, (2009)

This guide, prepared by International Women's Rights Action Watch, provides NGOs who wish to submit shadow reports to CEDAW with information on new opportunities presented by the UNs Harmonized Guidelines for reporting. Under the new structure, reporting State Parties and NGOs can submit a common core document that includes a full account of laws, policies and infrastructure relating to human rights policy and implementation rather than separate, targeted documents prepared for each separate treaty monitoring body. The guide provides practical suggestions on how to prepare a shadow report to CEDAW.

International Women's Rights Action Watch, Producing NGO Shadow Reports to CEDAW: A Procedural Guide (January 2009), online: < http://www1.umn.edu/humanrts/iwraw/procedural guide-08.html>.

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16
Organization of American States, OEA/SCR.L/V.II., Access to Justice for Women Victims of Violence in the Americas (2007),

This report by the Organization of American States examines the impediments to access to justice faced by indigenous women and makes note of institutional and private racism in the Americas that contributes to these impediments. The report focuses on inadequacies in the judicial system in regards to violence against women, noting problems with the administration of justice and existing laws. The report examines efforts to improve the administration of justice in regards to acts of violence against women through an examination of the justice sector, the passage of laws, and the implementation of government programs intended to address issues that predominantly affect women and concludes that they are insufficient. Finally, the report provides a list of general and contextual recommendations for improving access to justice for women victims of violence in the Americas.

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17
International Women's Rights Action Watch, Our Rights are Not Optional: A Resource Guide, International Women's Rights Action Watch - Asia Pacific (2005)

This resource guide seeks to inform readers on the context, intended role and actual text of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), with a specific focus on the Optional Protocol to the Convention (OP-CEDAW). The purpose of the guide is to provide information to enable a more holistic and effective approach to research, training and advocacy around the CEDAW Convention and OP-CEDAW. It includes an overview of CEDAW and OP-CEDAW and then offers practical advice on how the international review mechanism presented by OP-CEDAW functions. Recommendations for improvements to the current system are also included. The final section of the guide explains the ratification process and provides advice for enhancing advocacy and using OP-CEDAW. [Descriptors: CEDAW Convention, Implementing Women's Rights - International, International]

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18
International Law Association Committee on Feminism and International Law, Part II: Feminism in International Law: Committee Report, 72 INTERNATIONAL LAW ASSOCIATION REPORTS OF CONFERENCES, 601-643 (2006)

This Report forms part of a series of four Reports on various aspects of women and migration. The report continues the work on trafficking introduced in the 2004 Berlin Interim Report. The main focus of the report is on the legal framework of women's international labor migration. The author references the Workers Convention, international human rights and labor law conventions. The Report discusses the legal and gendered aspects of of female migrant workers' mobility in relation to their migration status, and advocates for a rights based approach to international migration.

19
International Women's Rights Action Watch, Producing NGO Shadow Reports to CEDAW: A Procedural Guide, Revised: June 2003

These procedural and format guidelines are designed to assist nongovermental organization in producing shadow reports during the state reporting process under the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW). The CEDAW Committee reviews shadow reports along with the official government reports when evaluating government efforts to meet the obligations of the CEDAW Convention. This guide includes background information on the state reporting procedure, advice on organizing a shadow report for maximum impact, suggestions for an executive summary, a list of useful materials, and advice on approaching the CEDAW Committee. [Descriptors: Applying Human Rights Law - International, CEDAW Convention, International]

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20
Human Rights Watch, Soldiers Who Rape, Commanders Who Condone (2009),

This report addresses sexual violence and military reform in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where the Forces Armées de la République Démocratique du Congo (FARDC), the government army, is one of the primary perpetrators of sexual violence. In this report, Human Rights Watch (1) provides a background of the abuses of sexual violence committed by FARDC, (2) examines efforts to stop that violence and (3) considers why such efforts have been unsuccessful. Senior officials of FARDC have escaped prosecution entirely and to date the only military personnel that have been prosecuted for sexual violence have been lower-ranked soldiers. Military commanders have also been documented to go to great lengths to shield their soldiers from prosecution. The report recommends that the Congolese government focus on strengthening the weak military justice system, improving living conditions of soldiers and removing officers from FARDC who have been responsible for past crimes. As these initiatives will take time to implement, the report recommends establishing a mixed chamber to prosecute high-ranking officers, armed group leaders, and civilian leaders responsible for war crimes and crimes against humanity who would otherwise not be tried by the International Criminal Court.

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International Conventions and Declarations

21
, The Optional Protocol to the Women's Convention, A/RES/54/4, 1999

The Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (OP-CEDAW) was adopted by the UN General Assembly on October 6, 1999 and entered into force December 21, 2000. The Optional Protocol provides for two procedures: 1) a communications procedures that allows women to submit claims of violations of rights potected under the Convention to the Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women; and 2) an inquiry procedure enabling the Committee to initiate inquiries into situations of grave or systematic violations of women's rights. [Descriptors: Applying Human Rights Law - International, CEDAW Convention, Key Texts, International]

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Other

22
Organization of American States, Report of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights on the Status of Women in the Americas, OEA/Ser.L/V/II.100, Doc. 17, October 13, 1998

This report brings together the results of the study conducted by the Special Rapporteur on women's rights as to how member state legislation and practices that affect the rights of women comply with the obligations of equality and nondiscrimination in the American Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man and the American Convention on Human Rights. Chapter I describes the Inter-American human rights system and how it can be used to protect women's rights; Chapter II outlines the methodology and mandate of the study; Chapter III presents the report's findings around a series of core issues pertaining to women's rights in the Americas; Chapter IV sets forth recommendations aimed at remedying discrimination and addressing its consequences. [Descriptors: Applying Human Rights Law - Regional, International - Latin America, International - North America]

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